Tag Archives: bus

Travelling on long distance buses in Mexico

I have travelled around Mexico a few times and always catching long distance buses. I find it easy, cheap and a good way to travel.

ADO, the largest bus company in Mexico, covers the whole country – some parts more than others – and you can even buy tickets online in advance. I used www.ado.com.mx/ado2 to check travel times and www.clickbus.com.mx to buy my tickets. In one occasion I decided to change my date of travel and changing ticket at the ADO station was a quick and smooth process.

Long distance ADO buses are very comfortable, with wide seats, lots of leg room, TV, a/c and toilets on board. They are also reasonably priced: a first class ticket from Cancun to Chetumal (6hrs) cost me less than MEX$400 (around £14)!

I caught ADO also from Cancun airport to the main bus terminal in town. The airport bus service runs every half hour and takes around 35min to town. For MEX$70 it’s a much better deal than any form of private transport (taxi or hotel shuttle).

When I was in Bacalar I then discovered another bus company, called Mayab. It is part of the ADO group, serving mainly the states of Yucatan and Quintana Roo, and provides cheaper service than the main ADO. The downside is that buses are not as good and travel times are longer due to the higher number of stops, yet they offer a valid and cheaper alternative to ADO. Tickets can be bought online using the ADO website or at bus stations themselves.

And how about the experience of travelling with lots of local people and discovering the country at a slower pace?!

Transport in Sri Lanka

In my two weeks in Sri Lanka my approach to the means of transport available in the country was a bit of mix’n’match, partly because I wanted to try different options (in general choosing the cheapest available) partly because on certain routes you have no choice!

So let me share here my experience and comments on all options I tried:

#Plane. Only to get into the country and back out again. The Bandaranaike airport is 35Km north of Colombo and can be reached by public transport. 2-bandaranaike-international-airportThere is an airport bus that leaves from a small car park on the left as you exit the airport – if you ask the airport staff they will point you in the right direction.
Rs 200 is what I paid for a single trip to Colombo but the fare seems to vary, depending on your bargaining skills. Alternatively you can catch a taxi and pay extortionate prices.

#City buses. I like them so I used them most times, even when carrying my suitcase. Buses are very crowded and never stop for more than a couple of seconds so you often have to jump on/off when the bus is still moving. Not many Westerners semed to travel like this but I think that everyone should try. And the locals were always helpful (I was offered seats, given directions, etc). Bus fares are ultracheap, for example I paid Rs 15 for each few Km ride within Colombo. You buy the tickets on board and the ticket guy never has much change so make sure you have small notes and coins on you.

#Long distance buses. The “standard” ones look like city buses and have no a/c. They get very crowded and very hot. My journey from Colombo to Palavi – just under 4hrs – wasn’t overly pleasant in the tropical heat of a late morning/lunchtime but it only cost Rs 150 (less than £1!!!). I wouldn’t do it everyday but it’s an interesting experience. Just bring lots of water and don’t expect toilets on board or toilet breaks. Minivans with a/c are available on most routes and are a much more comfortable option, at only slightly higher fare (Rs 180 for Anuradhapura-Dambulla, Rs 200 for Dambulla-Kandy).

#Trains. I travelled 1st class between Kandy and Colombo, and 2nd class between Colombo and Galle (and back). 1st class had a/c and seat reservation, very comfortable although not comparable to a Western-style 1st class. I bought the ticket at the station two days before travelling and had no issues whatsoever.

The 2nd class train had no a/c and the seats were grubby but ok. No seat reservation (you buy the ticket on the day) so get on the train quick and sit by the window to get some breeze! Trains can get very crowded too, though, and while my journey from Colombo to Galle was fine, the return was a bit cattle class. Yet I cannot complain: I sat the whole time (ok ok, it was on the floor next to the toilet!), I had fresh air coming from the open door and made friends with some backpackers who were sharing the floor space with me. Much luckier than those people standing in the middle of the aisle!

#Tuk tuks. Also called “three-wheeler taxis”, they are good for short-to-medium distances, cheaper than standard taxis and the favourite choice of many locals and tourists. As for me, I used them only when there were no buses available. In Colombo tuk tuks have meters, everywhere else you’ll have to agree a price before starting your journey. My advice is: have an idea of what distance you are going to travel and haggle accordingly. In Colombo I shared a tuk tuk with a fellow traveller for Rs 50/Km, the standard rate. In the countryside I negotiated Rs 1,200 for a 17-Km ride.

#Private car with driver. Not something I would usually go for, as too expensive when you travel on your own and also it lacks the character of catching public transport. But I used it once as I joined a couple who was travelling in the same direction as me. The 2-hr journey from the Kalpitiya area to Anuradhapura cost us Rs 12,000 in total, superpricey compared to my travel standards, but in 36C heat it was a welcome change!

Overall I found it easy to travel around Sri Lanka by public transport but be prepared for slow journeys and not the maximum of comfort. If you are in a hurry or cannot do without comfort, choose the private car option. I will meet you at destination when I arrive by bus :-).

Weekly Photo Challenge: Dialogue

A dialogue between two cities (London and Luang Prabang) via their most common forms of public transport and places of worship.

Featuring in the Daily Post’s Weekly Photo Challenge.

My epic journey from Da Lat to Hoi An via Da Nang

There are no toilets on the bus.
And I am the only Westerner on board.
And no one speaks any English.

These were the first thoughts that crossed my mind as I boarded the Phuong Trang (Futa) bus from Da Lat to Da Nang. Not before having had a major argument with the Futa staff who refused to tag my suitcase and give me any form of receipt when they stored it in the luggage hold.
This 14-hr bus ride is going to be fun. Not.

Inside the sleeper bus
Inside the sleeper bus

I had reserved a seat on the sleeper bus via my hotel in Da Lat and I hadn’t really bothered with many questions. I got picked up at the hotel and dropped off at the Da Lat bus station, where my ticket was waiting for me. Once I got to the bus I realised it was going to be an eventful overnight ride…

My seat/bed was actually quite comfortable and having booked on the “upstairs/window” I had a nice view. We went through mountain villages and stunning scenery, until the sun started setting and I feel asleep (courtesy of the travel sickness tablets).

More mountain scenery
More mountain scenery

Three hours into the journey we stopped at a restaurant. I think we were in the Nha Trang area, judging by some road signs. All announcements were made in Vietnamese only, though, and the rude and unhelpful Futa guys on board ignored any of my requests to explain how long we were going to be there. Great: I am completely on my own here! Roll your sleeves up, Chiara, I thought.
Back on the bus, we followed the road along the coast for some time. In the darkness surrounding us, the lights from the fishermen boats looked like a huge number of fireflies. It was stunning.

Then the bus started climbing up towards some mountain pass, overtaking on hairpin bends seemed to be common practice.
When we stopped again a few hours later – the Futa guys needed a smoke… – a few men got off the bus so I followed. Toilet break, yay! Only to find out that there were no toilets: we were in the middle of nowhere and the men were all standing on the nearby bridge with their legs apart. “Toilet for women?” I asked the Futa guys in my total naivety. They stared at me showing no understanding of my question, then looked at each other and started laughing. Their attitude was really getting on my nerves at that point. Then one of them pointed at the line of men standing by the bridge. Great: bush toilet, but with nowhere to hide. All I could do was going to the other end of the bridge and hope that the darkness would protect me. Not happy.
Back on the bus I fell asleep and slept most of the night.

At 6am we arrived in Da Nang. The bus dropped us off and left. This was not a bus station. And now where do I catch the bus to Hoi An? I was suddenly surrounded by ten men saying “Motorbike! Motorbike!”. No, I don’t want motorbike: it’s 30Km to Hoi An, I want the local bus. Tired and dehydrated I walked to the ticket office and asked for the bus. A heaven-sent guy told me to follow him, and walked me all the way to the bus station, which was 500m away, and left me in front of bus #1 to Hoi An. I got on board and was asked to pay 50,000 dong. No! I know the real price is 20,000 I said. I had read enough internet forums about this scam. The price dropped immediately to 30,000 and I agreed to that. Too tired to argue any further. After all, we are talking about 50c difference here…

An hour later we arrived at Hoi An bus station, which happens to be out of town. On for the last fight! Surrounded again by “motorbike!motorbike!” men, I got asked for 50,000 dong for a ride to town. No! You gotta be kidding. I know the price is 15,000 I said. “Oh town very far” they replied. I stubbornly stood in front of the town map with the GPS on my phone switched on, trying to work out how long it would take me to walk to my hotel and which direction to go.
And I didn’t give in to the motorbike men pressure. And I walked all the way.
Half an hour later and completely covered in sweat, I arrived at my hotel. Shattered.
It was 8am.
I had left Da Lat yesterday at 4pm.